The end of Google search as we know it (2024)

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The end of Google search as we know it (2)

The end of Google search as we know it

Google is changing the way its popular search feature works, feeding users AI-generated replies to their questions rather than directing them to other websites. The Post's AI reporter Gerrit De Vynck says it could change the internet forever.

Monday, May 13, 2024

The end of Google search as we know it (3)

The end of Google search as we know it (4)People stand in front of the words 'world of Google AI' (artificial intelligence) during the annual industry trade fair 'Hannover Messe', in Hanover, Germany, 22 April 2024. (Photo by HANNIBAL HANSCHKE/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock)

At its annual developer conference this week, tech giant Google is expected to tout big changes to its signature product, search. Instead of directing users to a list of websites or showing them an excerpt, Google’s AI will craft paragraphs of text that tries to answer users’ questions directly.

AI reporter Gerrit De Vynck says the change could have huge consequences for the internet. Because AI chatbots are still unreliable, and because the information feeding the generative answers comes from a range of sources, users will need to watch out for false information. And the new format means that sources across the web – bloggers, businesses, newspapers and other publishers – are likely to see a huge loss of traffic.

Gerrit joins us to break down what the changes to Google search mean for users, and why the company is moving in this direction.

Today’s show was produced by Emma Talkoff. It was edited by Lucy Perkins and mixed by Sean Carter. Thanks also to Heather Kelly.

Also on the show: The Climate Solutions team at the Post has an eye-opening story about the benefits of leaving your lawn unmowed and letting nature do its thing. Read it here.

Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

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The end of Google search as we know it (5)

The end of Google search as we know it

Google is changing the way its popular search feature works, feeding users AI-generated replies to their questions rather than directing them to other websites. The Post's AI reporter Gerrit De Vynck says it could change the internet forever.

Monday, May 13, 2024

The end of Google search as we know it (6)

The end of Google search as we know it (7)People stand in front of the words 'world of Google AI' (artificial intelligence) during the annual industry trade fair 'Hannover Messe', in Hanover, Germany, 22 April 2024. (Photo by HANNIBAL HANSCHKE/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock)

At its annual developer conference this week, tech giant Google is expected to tout big changes to its signature product, search. Instead of directing users to a list of websites or showing them an excerpt, Google’s AI will craft paragraphs of text that tries to answer users’ questions directly.

AI reporter Gerrit De Vynck says the change could have huge consequences for the internet. Because AI chatbots are still unreliable, and because the information feeding the generative answers comes from a range of sources, users will need to watch out for false information. And the new format means that sources across the web – bloggers, businesses, newspapers and other publishers – are likely to see a huge loss of traffic.

Gerrit joins us to break down what the changes to Google search mean for users, and why the company is moving in this direction.

Today’s show was produced by Emma Talkoff. It was edited by Lucy Perkins and mixed by Sean Carter. Thanks also to Heather Kelly.

Also on the show: The Climate Solutions team at the Post has an eye-opening story about the benefits of leaving your lawn unmowed and letting nature do its thing. Read it here.

Subscribe to The Washington Post here.

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The end of Google search as we know it (8)

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In today’s bonus episode, we break down Drake and Kendrick Lamar’s feud, the biggest beef in recent rap history.

Saturday, May 11, 2024

The end of Google search as we know it (9)

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The end of Google search as we know it (10)

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The end of Google search as we know it (11)

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The end of Google search as we know it (2024)

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